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From the authors: "This brief summarizes a longer paper American Indian and Alaskan Native Family Resiliency: A Protective Rainbow that breaks new ground in several ways. As one of the few empirically based studies on Native American family resiliency which included members of numerous tribal groups, the study explores the…
Description:  Author abstract: " A history of oppression and deficit orientation by the majority culture has resulted in pervasive negative stereotypes of Native Americans and has led to an undervaluing of the positive aspects of Native American culture. In looking forward to an increasingly multicultural society, it is crucial that social…
Description:  The authors discuss spirituality and resilience, and methods that Tribal Colleges are using to promote resilience in their students.
The first webinar in a two-part series that discussed the historical roles and identities of Two-Spirit/Native LGBTQ people, how historical/intergenerational trauma has impacted this community, and the efforts to bring back balance, beauty, and acceptance. Presenter: Lenny Hayes
Ethleen Iron Cloud-Two Dogs and Richard Two Dogs share information about the Lakota Worldview, describing the four stages of life recognized in the Lakota community and the ceremonies that accompany each stage. These ceremonies are believed to contribute to a balanced life from childhood through returning to the spirit world. This…
The experience of poverty early in the life course can have far-reaching impacts on children's health, development and educational success, well into adulthood. In this interview, Telethon Kids Research Focus Area Head, Brain and Behaviour Professor Steve Zubrick, notes that growing up poor is about more than just the size of…
Healing for Indigenous people is a powerful journey that can be collectively shared and/or can be a very personal path. This webinar explored and shared healing strategies from various Indigenous cultures as examples of how we are all connected. Facilitated by Center for Tribes staff and consultants Elsie Boudreau, Richard…
What is genetic memory? How can we know things we never learned? Emerging science is pointing to a broader understanding of genetics and what many indigenous cultures have long understood about how things are passed from one generation to the next. The newest resource list from the Center for Tribes…
The Center for Tribes is pleased to share a new resource list focused on Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs). The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) defines ACEs as… “stressful or traumatic events, including abuse and neglect. They may also include household dysfunction such as witnessing domestic violence or…
The Alaska Resilience Initiative promotes healthy communities and works to end child maltreatment. Leaders of this initiative hosted a 2016 gathering to ensure Alaska Native voices were heard. Participants provided recommendations on how to make existing ACE/resilience training materials more culturally relevant. 
From the National Indigenous Women’s Resource Center, this webinar shares information on ACEs and highlights evidence based and promising practices for working with children exposed to violence. Traditional and community-based efforts to address the problem are shared. 
This academic article focuses on the adverse childhood experiences and outcomes among American Indians and Alaska Natives.  The researchers found that American Indian and  Alaska Native children are significantly more likely to have adverse childhood experiences and complex resulting consequences when compared to non-Hispanic white children. 
This 2017 study examines the relationship between mothers’ ACEs and developmental risks for their own children. Finding a significant association, the need to address intergenerational trauma is highlighted.
Presented by Dolores Subia BigFoot, this 2013 webinar is part of a series on childhood trauma in Indian Country. This webinar presented findings from the Kaiser Permanente Study and adverse childhood experiences with a focus on American Indian and Alaska Native children.
This website provides a wealth of accessible information related to ACEs. They also have a free network with various community groups, including one with a shared goal of reducing ACEs in Native communities. The handout on Growing Resilient Communities 2.0 provides great information on starting a local initiative. 
The CDC has a webpage dedicated to sharing ACEs information and tools. Included here are details from the CDC-Kaiser Permanente Study, a large investigation of the long-term effects of ACEs. 
This article references a study conducted by James Cunningham with the University of Arizona Department of Family and Community Medicine and the UA Native American Research and Training Center. The article highlights the fact that in contrast to enduring stories about extraordinarily high rates of alcohol abuse among Native Americans,…
This 2017 PowerPoint presentation by Victoria Sweet, JD, highlights the issues and challenges of domestic violence when viewed through a child welfare lens, the lasting impacts of  historical/intergenerational trauma, and ICWA considerations. 
This handout from the National Indian Child Welfare Association (NICWA) highlights the struggle many parents in the child welfare system experience related to substance abuse, disparities in treatment, and disproportionate rates of removal.
The Indian Law Resource Center developed this 2016 guide with the intent of providing information and resources on how to use international advocacy in the work to end violence against Native women and girls. 
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